NALLUA

76 min., Documentary, Quebec, Canada, 2015
Directed byChristian Mathieu Fournier
Produced byLes vues du fleuve
LanguageInuktitut
Short description

The Pond Inlet Inuit in Nunavut live with the memory of a tragedy: in 1943, 25 people –over half the population of the community – died within the span of a few days. This personal and intimate documentary brings us into homes and lives of Ruth and Elisapie, two survivors of this tragedy.

Film details

Synopsis

The Pond Inlet Inuit in Nunavut live with the memory of a tragedy: in 1943, 25 people –over half the population of the community – died within the span of a few days. This personal and intimate documentary brings us into homes and lives of Ruth and Elisapie, two survivors of this tragedy. We join them on their journey back to the
ancestral land with their grandchildren, and see their efforts to strengthen the younger generation’s connection to place and culture, hoping to ground them in their history and traditions as they face the challenges of the future.

 

Credits

Director : Christian Mathieu Fournier
Research : José Gérin-Lajoie
Cinematography : Christian Mathieu Fournier
Editing : René Roberge
Sound Design : Claude Beaugrand
Score : Bertrand Chénier
Production : Nadine Beaudet
Distribution : Spira

 

 

This film is part of the SPIRA COLLECTION. For more information about SPIRA, please go on https://www.spira.quebec/en/

Director

Christian Mathieu Fournier

After studying film at Laval University, his documentary cinematic experience begins in 2002 with the movie To die offshore, reflecting the concerns of Gaspé fishermen, and Cursed machine!, a human portrait about the universe of compulsive gamblers on video poker lottery. In 2004, his film Make money, hi hello! on berylliosis affected workers of the Noranda mine earned him the Murdochville Audience Award and the price at Enviro Portneuf Film Festival on the environment. He followed then with Leandre Bergeron, with conviction hopeless (2008), a meeting with a nonconformist man unwavering in its commitment to freedom and his struggle for the defense of his social vision, political and family.

 

His most recent documentary, The angel of Grondines (2012) received the Audience Award at the Festival films Portneuf Environmental 2013. This sensitive film presents the eternal childhood of Joseph Stephen, 73, still living in the moment and the discovery of imaginary territories. His next documentary Nallua (2015) focuses on the community of Pond Inlet in Nunavut.